Mondays, 1–2 P.M.

Podcasts

Air date:
Listen here:

TTT1803 January 15 African-American Literature

David Todd Lawrence is associate professor in the Department of English at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, where he teaches African-American literature and culture, folklore studies, and cultural studies. His new book, "When They Blew the Levee," co-authored with Elaine Lawless, is forthcoming in July from University of Mississippi Press. He is currently the interim director of the American Culture and Difference Program at St. Thomas. Lawrence discusses his new book and shares his thoughts on the power of literature and story to illuminate the black experience in America.
Air date:
Listen here:

TTT1802 January 8 Youth Homelessness

Mention the word “homeless” and members of the public often conjure up images of unfortunate people, old and young, sleeping under bridges in a frigid Minnesota winter or, if they’re lucky, scoring a bed in a homeless shelter. The reality is more complicated than that, including the experiences of a disturbingly large population of homeless youth. In many cases, what’s needed for them are connections with people who are already in — or near — their life. TruthToTell explores an innovative relationship-based approach with Jacqueline White, founder and director of the Minnesota Host Home Network, and Cindy Ley, executive director of Open Doors for Youth, a drop-in and resource center for homeless youth in Elk River. We will also hear from a former youth participant in the host network program.
Air date:
Listen here:

settlement_houses-part1

In a rebroadcast of a popular program from 2010, TruthToTell looks at the first two of four major community centers in Minneapolis and St. Paul which started life as Settlement Houses, where well-heeled families bought buildings, lived in poor neighborhoods and served their neighbors and new Americans providing opportunities to eat, play, gather, and learn how to be citizens, homemakers, and speak English, while preserving tradition, language and culture. Some called it Americanization (a good thing at the time-or was it?), some called it social engineering or control (always controversial), but settlement houses are celebrating yet another milestone with the 100th anniversary of Jane Addams’ biography, the story of the patron of Chicago’s Hull House among the great celebrated advocates of the East End London-born movement of 1880. In part I, we speak with key movers at Minneapolis’ Pillsbury United Communities (which combined Pillsbury House, Waite House and Unity House in Cedar-Riverside, South Minneapolis and North Minneapolis) and St. Paul’s Hallie Q. Brown Community Center – a tribute to St. Paul’s African-American leaders’ resolve to provide the same serves other settlement houses had provided for some 30 to 40 years, but had denied access to them. In part II, we hear from leaders at two other historic settlements – Phyllis Wheatley Community Center – the Minneapolis counterpart to Hallie Q. Brown – and long-lasting Neighborhood House, which started serving St. Paul's Russian Jews in the 1880s, became a Mexican centerpiece and evolved into a  durable community center serving all new Americans and always on St. Paul’s West Side.
In a rebroadcast of a popular program from 2010, TruthToTell looks at the first two of four major community centers in Minneapolis and St. Paul which started life as Settlement Houses, where well-heeled families bought buildings, lived in poor neighborhoods and served their neighbors and new Americans providing opportunities to eat, play, gather, and learn how to be citizens, homemakers, and speak English, while preserving tradition, language and culture. Some called it Americanization (a good thing at the time-or was it?), some called it social engineering or control (always controversial), but settlement houses are celebrating yet another milestone with the 100th anniversary of Jane Addams’ biography, the story of the patron of Chicago’s Hull House among the great celebrated advocates of the East End London-born movement of 1880. In part I, we speak with key movers at Minneapolis’ Pillsbury United Communities (which combined Pillsbury House, Waite House and Unity House in Cedar-Riverside, South Minneapolis and North Minneapolis) and St. Paul’s Hallie Q. Brown Community Center – a tribute to St. Paul’s African-American leaders’ resolve to provide the same serves other settlement houses had provided for some 30 to 40 years, but had denied access to them. In part II, we hear from leaders at two other historic settlements – Phyllis Wheatley Community Center – the Minneapolis counterpart to Hallie Q. Brown – and long-lasting Neighborhood House, which started serving St. Paul's Russian Jews in the 1880s, became a Mexican centerpiece and evolved into a  durable community center serving all new Americans and always on St. Paul’s West Side.
Air date:
Listen here:

TTT1752 December 25 Circle of the Witch re-boadcast

Join TruthToTell this week for a rebroadcast of a popular 2013 two-part series on the collectivist Circle of the Witch Feminist Theatre troupe. A premiere change agent of early 1970s Minnesota, the collective presented homegrown plays and dealt out lessons in women’s social and economic change. These were plays, sketches and multimedia presentations that jerked a tear or two or took a good bite out of conscience and traditional sensibilities about the roles and pigeonholes to which women were so often assigned back then. Most say the change to real equity has, like the issue of race in America, been far slower than it should have been. Comedy and tragedy shared the stage. The “ouch” musical satire of “Sexpot Follies” was met with the occupational hazards for women and the internalized conflicts between mothers and daughters of “Lady in a Corner,” or the history-tracing and often sad “Time is Passing” and the abstractions of the “The Changebringers.” Many of the women that formed the collective and shared all its original playwriting, composing and performing duties also lived communally with other women, and some men as well, including Tom O’Connell, who produced the series with Civic Media founder Andy Driscoll. Four of the founding seven members joined Andy in the studio. They formed the core in what would become a company of some 24 rotating cast members and creators, and as you will hear, took their often biting and pointed satirical sketches to college campuses across the state.
Air date:
Listen here:

TTT1751 December 18 Politics

The election of Democrat Doug Jones in deep-red Alabama, history-making local elections in Minneapolis and St. Paul, and forced resignations in the State Legislature and U.S. Senate: A lot is happening in politics. To understand some of the forces behind these dramatic events, TTT interviews its very own political guru, Matthew Filner, professor of political science at Metropolitan State University.